Original Articles

Water Sport-Related Spine Injury in Bali: A Review and Preliminary Study

I Ketut Suyasa , Anak Agung Wiradewi Lestari, I Putu Yuda Prabawa, Ketut Kris Adi Marta

I Ketut Suyasa
Department of Orthopedics and Traumatology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Udayana, Sanglah Hospital, Bali, Indonesia. Email: iksysa@gmail.com

Anak Agung Wiradewi Lestari
Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Udayana, Sanglah Hospital, Bali, Indonesia

I Putu Yuda Prabawa
Department of Clinical Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Udayana, Sanglah Hospital, Bali, Indonesia

Ketut Kris Adi Marta
Orthopedics and Traumatology Specialist Program, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Udayana, Sanglah Hospital, Bali, Indonesia
Online First: September 08, 2019 | Cite this Article
Suyasa, I., Lestari, A., Prabawa, I., Marta, K. 2019. Water Sport-Related Spine Injury in Bali: A Review and Preliminary Study. Indonesia Journal of Biomedical Science 13(2). DOI:10.15562/ijbs.v13i2.220


Background: Spinal Injury is a devastating injury with life-long impact on an individual’s health and quality of life. Sport­ing activities, such as water sport, is also known contributed to the spinal injury.  This study aims to evaluate the water sport-related spine injury (WS-RSI) which is occurred in Bali during 2017 as a preliminary study at BROS Hospital.

Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted retrospectively among 55 patients who got an injury during water-sport activity in 2017 and admitted to BROS Hospital, Denpasar, Bali by medical records. There was 28 patient-related spine injury. Demographic status regarding age, sex, length of stays, hemoglobin (Hb), random blood glucose, nationality, country origin, treatment, patient’s status, history of alcohol intake, type of water sport, and the location of spine injury were recorded. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 25 for Windows in mean±SD, percentage, and odds ratio (OR) as well as statistically significant if P-value less than 0.05.

Results: Indonesian travelers were predominant in WS-RSI (53.6%), followed by China and Australia (17.9%), India, Japan, and European countries (3.6%, respectively). The average age of patients was higher in spine injury (47.89±15.98 years; P=0.047). Both sexes were equal (50%). There was no significant difference in Hemoglobin (Hb) (11.08±1.30 g/dL) and random blood glucose (100.65±21.37 mg/dL) (P>0.05) levels. However, there was a significant difference among nationality, type of treatment, patient’s status, and type of WS-RSI compared with non-spine injury (P<0.05). Based on variables, banana boat, foreign travelers, conservative treatment, and outpatient status were having a higher risk in WS-RSI (OR= 4.275; 5.143; 5.014; 7.389; P<0.05, respectively)

Conclusion: As a preliminary study, recent findings at BROS Hospital, Denpasar, Bali suggest that several factors are having a higher risk towards water sport-related spine injuries such as older age, banana boat, foreign travelers, conservative treatment, and outpatient status

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