Case Reports

Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) as modalities therapy of venous ulcer

Luh Made Mas Rusyati , Ni Nyoman Suryawati, I Gusti Agung Ayu Dwi Karmila

Luh Made Mas Rusyati
Dermatology and Venereology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Udayana-Sanglah General Hospital Denpasar, Bali-Indonesia. Email: rusyati@unud.ac.id

Ni Nyoman Suryawati
Dermatology and Venereology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Udayana-Sanglah General Hospital Denpasar, Bali-Indonesia

I Gusti Agung Ayu Dwi Karmila
Dermatology and Venereology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Universitas Udayana-Sanglah General Hospital Denpasar, Bali-Indonesia
Online First: December 30, 2019 | Cite this Article
Rusyati, L., Suryawati, N., Karmila, I. 2019. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) as modalities therapy of venous ulcer. Indonesia Journal of Biomedical Science 13(2). DOI:10.15562/ijbs.v13i2.222


Introduction: Stasis/venous ulcers are defined as ulcers which do not completely heal within 3 months and generally occurred over the age of 40 years or younger. Conventional treatment requires a long period of time. New therapy using platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) can accelerate healing.
Case:
A serial cases of venous ulcers. The first case, a 17-year-old woman, was diagnosed with the right leg venous ulcer for 6 months, was treated with PRF every week and wound closure occurred at the 4th week. The second case was an 85-year-old man, diagnosed with venous ulcer at right pedis since 7 years ago, and was treated with PRF. The wound healed within seven weeks.
Discussion:
Stasis ulcers are chronic ulcers that sometimes require long hospitalization and prolonged treatment, and it affects the socio-economic and quality of life of the patients. Platelet-rich fibrin (PRF) is autologous blood that is rich in fibroblast growth factor (FGF), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), platelet-derived growth factors (PDGFs), transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β), epidermal growth factor (VEGF), and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) which can help accelerate wound healing without hospitalization. This method has been carried out in several countries, with wound healing occurred at week 15th.
Conclusion:
There have been 2 reported cases of venous ulcers treated with PRF and achieved wound healing after 4 weeks (first case) and 7 weeks (second case) of therapy.

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