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The consistency of visual acuity measurement using PEEK acuity and Snellen-E performed by trained teachers in elementary school students

Abstract

Background: Visual impairment in children affects growth and development, psychological, social, daily activities, which reduce the quality of life. Children often don't realize that they see "lack of" and do not complain of any difficulty in seeing. Collaboration between medical and non-medical personnel could be developed as a tiered health service team. Teachers as educators could help the health service team through health education and eye screening. The purpose of this study was to find out the consistency of visual acuity measurements by trained teachers using PPEK acuity and Snellen-E.

Methods: This study is an analytic cross sectional study conducted on 178 samples in elementary school. Visual acuity was measured by trained teachers using PEEK Acuity and Snellen-E cards and ETDRS by an ophthalmologist. Data analysis using Bland Altman and Rank-Spearman correlation test.

Results : Mean difference in visual acuity measurement with PEEK Acuity by trained teacher and ETDRS by ophthalmologist are 0,0028 logMAR (p = 0,543; 95% CI -0,0063 – 0,0119; 95% limit of agreement -0,11766 - 0,12326). Mean difference in visual acuity measurement with Snellen-E by trained teacher and ETDRS by ophthalmologist shows 0,0090 logMAR (p = 0,103; 95% CI -0.0018 – 0.0198; 95% limit of agreement -0.13426 –  0.15225). Mean difference in visual acuity measurement with PEEK Acuity and Snellen-E by trained teacher shows -0,0062 logMAR (p = 0.248; 95% CI -0,0175– 0,0052; 95% limit of agreement -0,15667 – 0,144269).

Conclusion: Visual acuity measurement using PEEK Acuity and Snellen-E by trained teachers and ETDRS by an ophthalmologist are consistent and could replace each other.
Section

References

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How to Cite

Andayani, A., Saraswati, N. M. G., Suryathi, N. M. A., & Rahayu, N. K. (2021). The consistency of visual acuity measurement using PEEK acuity and Snellen-E performed by trained teachers in elementary school students. Indonesia Journal of Biomedical Science, 15(2), 145–148. https://doi.org/10.15562/ijbs.v15i2.325

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Ari Andayani
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Ni Made Gita Saraswati
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Ni Made Ari Suryathi
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Ni Kompyang Rahayu
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